As an MBA alum from CBS, you can sign up for MBA electives and join this year's current EMBA and Full-time MBA classes. This is an oustanding opportunity to upgrade your MBA knowledge and learn with peers.

For a detailed description of each course, please read more below.

Course fee: One elective costs DKK 5000.

How to sign up: Send an email to the MBA Alumni Team on contact@mba-alumni.dk. Requests are handled on a first come - first served basis.

 

The increasing integration of digital technologies into the key functions of businesses is leading to a paradigm shift. The diffusion of digital technologies – such as Artificial Intelligence, the Internet of Things, digital platforms, and blockchain – is not anymore simply about providing efficiency gains to traditional business processes, but has the potential of opening up for the creation of new services, new business models, and entire new industries.

This course focuses on the phenomenon of digitalization to demonstrate how managers can draw on the novel ways in which digitalization is transforming business. Students will be provided with the tools to understand the transformative nature of the digitalization phenomenon, and will draw on the analysis of practical cases to formulate successful strategies enabled by digitalization.

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Explain the transformative impacts of digitalization on industries and business models;
  • Critically assess the potential of disruptive technologies;
  • Evaluate the use of digital technologies in key business functions;
  • Formulate innovative business strategies enabled by digitalization.

 

Faculty

Professor Rony Medaglia, Copenhagen Business School

 

Time

20-22 June at 9.00-14.30

27-28 June at 9.00-14.30

 

Exam

5 July at 9.00

Corporate Governance is “the control and direction of companies” by owners, boards, regulators and stakeholders. This course introduces students to the mechanisms of governance: finding the best owner of a company, exercising active ownership, composing a competent board, balancing management and board work, designing an incentive program and so on.  Students learn to assess the costs and benefits of alternative governance mechanisms – law, ownership, boards, incentives etc. - and how they can be applied in individual companies. The course covers the theory and mechanisms of corporate governance and comparative systems of governance. Globally, corporate governance is undergoing rapid change as a consequence of the financial crisis. We focus on agency problems in listed firms, how they can be mitigated by regulation, ownership, boards and other mechanisms, and how alternative governance models handle their problems.

The aim of this course is to gain an in-depth understanding of corporate governance and how corporate governance influences corporate performance. The course will introduce the students to corporate governance issues and teach them to analyze how different corporate governance mechanisms – like ownership and board structure, legal systems and incentives – contribute to the solution of agency problems and influence corporate economic performance. Using this framework the course will then study the impact of corporate governance on corporate performance depending on company specific factors. The course will enable students to undertake a corporate governance review of an individual company including an assessment of how ownership, board structure, managerial incentives and system characteristics influence company performance.

More specifically students will (within the practical limitations of a single course):

  • Learn how to identify and analyze corporate governance (agency) problems.
  • Learn to analyze how the corporate governance of a particular company is likely to influence its economic performance. 
  • Learn to appreciate how the governance, behaviour and performance of individual companies are shaped by the governance system, in which they operate.
 
Faculty

Professor Steen Thomsen, Copenhagen Business School

 

Time

20-24 May at 9.00-14.30

 

Exam

24 May at 16:00 to 25 May at 16:00 (24-hours)

In this elective, we will study the following major corporate events:

  • Initial Public Offering (IPO)
  • Mergers and acquisitions (M&A)
  • Leverage buyouts (LBO)
  • Restructurings in financial distress
  • Corporate spin-offs

We will cover the main characteristics and drivers of these events and discuss the challenges and risks related to the events. The discussions will bring in aspects of, for example, financial markets, valuation, financing, payout policy, risk management, and corporate governance including incentives and strategy.   

The course will be based on the discussion of several interesting cases and the participants are expected to prepare these cases at home and to participate in case presentations and discussions in class. You will be assumed to be familiar with the tools from core finance courses (capital structure, WACC, valuation, etc.).

 

Faculty

Professor Ken L. Bechmann, Copenhagen Business School

 

Time

23 April at 9.00-14.30

24 April at 9.00-16.15

25 April at 9.00-16.15

26 April at 9.00-16.15

 

Exam

Hand-in 6 May

On the course

Much of what we want to achieve at work involves negotiating. These negotiations can be a formal process such as with a client or customer over a new supply contract, or can occur more informally in meetings and conversations to deal with issues and solve problems. The purpose of this course is to assist participants build on their existing experience and skills to develop a strategic approach to these negotiations.

 

Learning objectives

As a result of participating in this course you will

1) Understand the core tasks in the process of reaching agreement

2) Identify key strategic and behaviour-related recommendations from the negotiation research literature

3) Recognise and respond to different negotiation strategies, including any cultural dimensions

4) Be able to reflect on one’s negotiations and so continue to improve one’s negotiation skills.

 

The teaching methods

The material that will be presented in class will be well grounded in the negotiation research and best practice. The course will be highly participative and will require students to be fully involved through reflection, through discussion of their own experiences and of case studies of business negotiations, and through role-play exercises that have been designed to highlight key aspects of the negotiation process.

The course will emphasise the importance of ‘reflection-in-action’ as a way to manage the dynamics of interaction between the parties and manage the process of reaching agreement. Participants will be provided with a number of negotiation tools to handle the strategic and behavioural aspects of their negotiations.

 

Pre-course task

Will you please give some thought to a negotiation (preferably work-related) that you have been involved in. Please make some notes on the negotiation and bring them to class. This will serve as a point of reference in your own experience as we explore various aspects of the negotiation process. The following questions may be of some use in helping you to analyse the negotiation.

What were the main differences between the parties?

What happened? (What was cooperative?; What was competitive?)     

Why did the negotiations unfold the way they did?

 

Faculty:

Professor Ray Fells, Business School, The University of Western Australia

Exam Format: Individual written exam assignment (3 ECTS). Max 10 pages (+appendices)

 

 

 Period

 Structure

 Exam

 

 Negotiation

 May 2, 3 and 4,

 2019

 Block seminar:

 Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.

 All days 9 am to 6 pm

 

 Hand-in of exam assignment:

 June 6, 2019 at 12 noon

 

Big Data has the potential to revolutionize the art of management. Although there is still a paucity of empirical research to assess the business value of big data, the studies that exist show that companies that do best are those that use data as a key strategic tool. These companies embed data centrally in their strategic decision-making. They collect, process, share and proactively use data to improve both internal processes (e.g. production, logistics) and exploration of new types of interaction with stakeholders (e.g. supply chain, B2B, B2C). In contrast, companies that are likely to fail first and fast are the ones that overlook the usefulness of Big Data. The focus is on Big Data (that identifies new, interesting behavioral insights). Experts are concerned that especially SMEs seem to be divided into pursuers/users and deniers of Big Data technology. We also introduce Small Data (i.e., deep socio-cognitive data) which identifies profound social, cognitive and emotive drivers that underlie much of the observed behavior which Big Data detect.

Big Data makes it possible both to improve logistics (to save money) and to create more relevant and meaningful customer experiences leading to an increase in top line. Yet, applying Big Data requires technological savviness as well as the ability to rethink current strategic orientations and opportunities--in other words, a cognitive agility and perspective taking that often challenge existing managerial mindsets related to market approaches. Companies that continue to see the world through their existing managerial mindset risk becoming expensive old companies (i.e., old businesses approaches with new technology) and unable to generate the necessary impact, as managers remain stuck in their current mental mindsets and silo thinking. We introduce four dominant managerial mindsets, each of which confines mangers to certain perspectives, and use new technologies in particular ways. We illustrate the consequences of such mindsets through a series of cases. It follows, that to utilize a new technology (e.g., Big Data) and disrupt existing processes, managers need to become aware their mindsets. This can be quite difficult. Therefore, we introduce a mindset test that identifies your managerial mindset. So far, more than thousand managers has taken this test. We introduce insights gained from these tests, including how managers have worked with changing/adjusting their mindsets within management teams. If companies want to create disruptive innovations and interact with the market in new ways, managers need to become aware of their own and their colleagues’ mindsets, and whether these corresponds to that of their core stakeholders (e.g., customers). Matching the right managerial mindset with the right technology is key to disrupting existing practices during the ongoing technology-mindset interaction in the organization and the market. We show how such a matching enables organizations to become more nimble, proactive, and innovative. We also discuss how best to introduce new technology-mindset to an organization.

This course addresses, among other, following issues:

  • Improving the logistics with Big Data (structured/unstructured)
  • Improving market strategies through optimizing the technology-mindset interaction
  • Mindset Matrix
  • Technology-Mindset Innovation Matrix
  • Processes and support for data collection, analysis, and use
  • When to anticipate disruptions by smaller more agile organizations
  • How to proactive work with Big and Small (deep socio-cognitive) Data
  • Leadership, culture and support for introducing knowledge sharing based on data across the organization
  • How to interpret data and communicate findings internally as well externally so it is of use for the organization and makes a difference to the customer
  • Moral, ethical, and especially legal issues in relation to data collection and use
 
Faculty:

Professor Torsten Ringberg, Department of Marketing, Copenhagen Business School.
Per Østergaard Jacobsen, External Lecturer, Department of Marketing, Copenhagen Business School

Exam Format: Individual written exam assignment (3 ECTS). Max 10 pages (+appendices), to be uploaded to CBS Digital Exam

 

 

 Period

 Structure

 Exam

 Strategic Use

 of Big Data

 May 2, 3 and 4,

 2019

 Block seminar:

 Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.

 All days 9 am to 6 pm

 

 Hand-in of exam assignment:

 June 6, 2019 at 12 noon